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Self-Implementation
Self-Implementation

John Vanderpoel
VP--Compliance and Finance

Bill, great question! We've been running on EOS now for about 18 months, and are also a small team of 14. One of our challenges was getting our Visionary out of the business....when we first started he was on our accountability chart as the Visionary and the Director of Sales. One of our annual rocks is to get him to 100% Visionary role.

It's pretty common in smaller organizations that individuals wear many hats. For instance, I'm the Integrator, as well as the owner of the Compliance and the owner of Finance, which includes HR, Office Management and Accounting. EOS... (More)

@Bill Bennett173 probably the most consistent comment I've heard from everyone implementing EOS (big and small) is they didn't call out and directly address people issues as fast as they wish they did. If you're doing EOS, that means you want to grow and some people that were good for your past might not be good for your future. Those are tough conversations but everyone will be better off if you don't shield others from your expectations.

Other things I think are common for us little guys is not having mature data. Everything in our ERP system was cobbled together... (More)

Hey, @Andrew McCutchen132 congrats on starting this journey. It's a game changer.

Your starting point for the A/C is that you have three major functions: sales/mktg, ops, and finance/admin.

It's very common for some of these functions to be split into multiple boxes -- sales/mktg can turn into a sales seat and a marketing seat, finance/admin is often split into several, and in cases like yours where you have distinct lines of business the ops seat can be split (into engineering services, contract manufacturing, and staffing).

So splitting seats is very common, but combining the distinct functions into a single... (More)

I didn't find EOS until 17 years into running my company - but I can tell you that the biggest mistake we made in those first years was trying to be everything to everybody. Basically if we had the skills to do something we'd do it. Our marketing message was so muddy that prospective buyers were not even sure what we did.

It took me a long time to get here, but now I look when looking at the 1 and 3 year goals, I break down each initiative into rocks and assign budget and prerequisites to each. So, we... (More)